Gucci Taps Into the Internet to Find What’s Next For Their Brand


BY BRENNA O’DONNELL

Inspiration has always come in a plethora of forms, and in recent years the fashion industry has been taking cues from the world wide web and more specifically, social media. While there are sticklers out there criticizing how attached younger generations are to technology, some clothing brands have used this obsession to their advantage in order to not only reach a younger audience, but to also find inspirations for their collections. Gucci is one of the pioneers of this new opportunity.

Since his appointment as Gucci’s Creative Director in 2015, Alessandro Michele has not shied away from utilizing social media as tool for the brand. Specifically, Gucci has commissioned artists and illustrators with thousands of followers on Instagram to design for the luxury brand.

Most recently, Gucci’s Resort 2018 show included a shirt designed by Spanish artist Ignasi Monreal, who uses a combination of photography and digital painting to create original and striking designs which he usually shares with his 27,000+ Instagram followers.

Just before their resort show, Gucci also released a limited edition t-shirt collection designed by British illustrator Angelica Hicks entitled “Gucci Geek” which used some of the quirky illustrations found on her 43,900 follower strong Instagram. Gucci’s technique of using artists who are popular on social media is especially clever because it attracts the artist’s niche of followers to the brand, as they are more likely to purchase clothes showcasing the art they already admire.

This collaboration with Instagram-famous artists started back in fall of 2015 with #GucciGram, a initiative that invited artists to put their own spin on the iconic Italian brand. The result was an intriguing gallery of what happens when one combines fashion, art, and social media.

But it’s not just about finding what art will adorn the clothes and who to showcase on their Instagram; with memes as their muse Gucci took an internet-cultured approach to their advertising by having a line of advertisements completely in the form of popular memes. These are the kinds of memes people see everyday on their feeds, and since these are already familiar they don’t feel like ads, but rather something consumers can relate to and laugh with.

 

The Internet Age is here, and Gucci has made it a point to be an avid participant in the inspiring new time. Where others see social media obsession, Gucci sees opportunity and integrates it into their brand by collaborating with artists, and advertising their designs in accessible new forms.