MIU MIU’S newest fashion film plants a wacky SEED in their ‘Women’s Tales’ film series


BY GIOVANNA GATTO

Namoi Kawase is Miu Miu’s eleventh female filmmaker in their ‘Women’s Tales’ film series. She premiered a “wacky” feature entitled “Seed,” which plants the foundation for embracing a free-spirited lifestyle. Kawase brings to the screen Japanese actress Sakura Ando as a lyrical pixie. The film follows young Ando as she is gallivanting throughout the backwoods of Nora, all the way to her arrival in Shinjuku, Tokyo.

As the film opens, we quickly see how Kawase utilized stop motion filmmaking to show Ando contorting herself, giving a chilling sensation. This freestyle movement is a theme throughout all of Kawase’s films, lending the productions a quirky but aesthetic feeling. As the film progresses with artistic close-ups and nature montages, Ando’s whimsical movement draws the attention of a young man. The man offers Ando an apple in return for her “Seed” by speaking the first word within the film, “Swap.” Now the proud owner of an oversized red apple, Ando takes her fruit onto the streets of Shinjuku, swapping with a homeless man for a translucent cloth. Again we see unconventional movement, but this time the elderly man joins in. Through his smiling face the man insists that she must be “wacky,” but Ando is just a bohemian woman seeking to experience life.

“I wanted the character in my film to gain something which motivates her to start something or change herself,” explains Kawase. “Through these exchanges, I tried to show the human exchange of hearts.”

During each encounter, Ando does not just “swap” for a cloth or an apple, she receives a part of them, an experience. “Seed” reads as an anthem to the extraordinary, a poem for the spontaneous women. Namoi Kawase tests her audience’s ability to accept eccentric work with a production that praises individuality. Like the brand Miu Miu, Kawase’s offbeat film cultivates the free spirit of a woman. This film is not only nine minutes of fantastic camera work, but it is nine minutes of a beautifully crafted work of art, planting a seed for fashion filmmakers of the future.